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Jul 14, 2014

Can high heels damage your feet?

Very excited to have a little guest blog from our friends down at PodMed in Double Bay.  We treat alot of women with foot & lower limb problems…. when discussing aspects of their rehabilitation the wearing of high heels is often a question that comes up… So we asked the podiatrists…. they are at the end of the day experts when it comes to feet!

READ THE BLOG HERE

Categories Ankle Exercise & fitness General Issues Health and Wellbeing Tags feet high heels foot pain podiatry physiotherapy stretching strengthening orthotics

Jun 3, 2014

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

It’s got many names…. rotator cuff tendinitis, swimmers shoulder, throwers shoulder, subacromial impingement or subacromial bursitis. These are all smart, intelligent sounding names for pain that occurs deep in the anterolateral shoulder (anterior meaning front & lateral meaning side… so to the front and side)

Lets do a little anatomy recap: The shoulder is a ball and socket joint; likened to a golf ball on a golf tee. The humerus or upper arm bone sits against a small socket called the glenoid. It’s an inherently unstable joint which is why we are able to perform all the weird & wacky movements with our arms.

The rotator cuff are a group of 4 muscles: supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis and teres minor. Their role? to depress the head of the humerus essentially assisting the joint capsule and shoulder ligaments to hold it snug in its socket.

READ FULL BLOG HERE

Categories shoulder Exercise & fitness Health and Wellbeing Tags shoulder pain rotator cuff impingement tendonitis shoulder physiotherapy strengthening stretching massage dry needling

Are you hypermobile?

As physiotherapists we spend ALOT of time working with people who have stiff joints, tight muscles, reduced movement….. All of these things present as a lack of mobility, which is, in most cases, resulting in pain (hence why they are sitting in my waiting room).

BUT sometimes we forget about the other side of the coin….. The hypermobile ones, those that have TOO much movement, their joints have more range than required, their muscles are too flexible.

This is actually a problem that exists far more commonly than one may think, often it is asymptomatic & people won’t even be aware that their body is a little more like an elastic band than their best friends, BUT in some cases joint hypermobility syndrome can cause pain.

Joint hypermobility is usually inherited; if your mum is super super flexible, chances you will be too. There is nothing you can do to change it or prevent it, unfortunately its due to a gene representation in the connective tissue (the glue that holds our bodies together) causing it to become more pliable& more stretchy allowing for excessive movement at certain joints.

People with hypermobile joints have a higher incidence of dislocation and sprains of involved joints. The hypermobility tends to decrease with age as we naturally become less flexible.

READ FULL BLOG HERE

Categories Exercise & fitness General Issues Health and Wellbeing Tags hypermobile flexibility movement strengthening stretching physiotherapy

Feb 10, 2014

Don't be 'hamstrung' by hamstring injury

The rugby season is rapidly approaching… training is back in full swing… the club is finally showing a few signs of life again; felt a little like a ghost town during the off-season… and the best part? (Insert sarcasm here) I trade sunny Saturday afternoon’s lazing poolside for sweaty footballers, strapping tape and deep heat.

In most professional sports these days a lot of time and money is invested into ‘injury prevention programs’. Players are screened individually with data used to create personalised gym programs  tailored to suit each athletes specific strength and mobility needs…. All this in attempt to try and keep players on the field week in week out.

A big focus in all codes of rugby and also football (or soccer as I like to call it) has been preventing hamstring strains and tears. Easily one of the most common injuries that can sideline players for weeks and furthermore when correct rehabilitation doesn’t take place the chance of re-occurrence can further delay return to play.

To develop an effective ‘prevention’ program we need to address the reasons why hamstrings seem to be so vulnerable to injury.

READ FULL BLOG HERE

Categories Exercise & fitness General Issues Tags hamstring hamstring strain hamstring tear massage strengthening pre season training gym dry needling physiotherapy